Posts Tagged: agile

The Ultimate Patch

Recently a company called Blue Prism and their product were brought to my attention. You can’t easily tell it from their website, but what they offer is basically an intelligent integration of systems… through their UIs. In other words, their software links systems by interacting with them as a human user would – clicking icons,

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A letter to Scrum Masters

Dear Scrum Master! Being a Professional Scrum Trainer, agile coach & consultant for a while I had a chance to work with around a thousand Scrum Masters across different organizations. I see recurring patterns of misunderstanding and misapplication of Scrum usually visible in how Scrum Masters act. Based on that experience I want to share

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The Business Manifesto

The Agile Manifesto has spawned a whole slew of methods & practices that took the IT industry by storm. We have a second wave of change coming close on agile’s heels – the New Wave of Management inspired by thinkers like Jurgen Appelo and Steve Denning. Numerous trainers, coaches and “gurus” talk about such things

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Practical advice – physical environment

I usually write here about leadership and management, but this time I want to share some practical advice. A while ago I started writing a book about the environment agile teams need to flourish. I write in on a platform called LeanPub – its key differentiation is that you can there publish before your book

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Reconciling “agile” and “traditional”

This is a question that I get quite often: how do you reconcile the new agile processes like Scrum or Kanban or new approaches to product development (like Lean Startup) both based on empiricism with old, traditional, prediction based project management methods? It seems hard because the traditional approach is all about planning & execution

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Requirements for software – a dysfunction?

Traditionally software development is driven by requirements – descriptions of functions the product should perform once done. In the past those requirements were handed down to the development teams as a bulky specification document. Now, with agile methods being widely used they are usually put on a backlog. This backlog is managed by someone –

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Culture is everything, processes are nothing

A change is underway in management, especially in high-tech companies. This – as I call it – “New Wave of Management” started by the Agile and Lean movements now includes other ideas like “Management 3.0” or “Radical Management” (both also excellent books). It is visible also outside software development with companies changing their structure to

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Improvement is boring

The empiricism underpinning all agile methods means that people live in a constant inspect & adapt loop. It is primarily about the product being worked on – but it also applies to teams themselves. The idea is that with agile not only the product evolves and gets better, but also the teams – and thus

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In defense of retrospectives

Bob Marshall wrote on his popular blog, that retrospectives make no sense if they are not about a hypothesis – or in other words, if they are not about analyzing why things didn’t go as we envisioned. This was followed with others voicing their agreement (example). While I agree with Bob on many things this

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Ethical obligation – legal obligation?

When I talk to software developers[1] I always stress that as professionals they have an ethical obligation to deliver good code quality. I’m not alone in this – people far more known and respected, like Ken Schwaber for example, keep on saying the very same thing for years now: if you are software professionals you

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